Though technologies like Microsoft Kinect and Leap Motion are bringing gesture based control of devices to reality, they still require a “field of vision” for the device to recognize and track gestures.

I believe that real breakthrough in gesture and posture recognition will be about introspecting rather than inspecting the body, and I’m tracking closely on the companies that are creating parts or whole products that enable this, or software and platforms that build upon this.

I believe that real breakthrough in gesture and posture recognition will be about introspecting rather than inspecting the body

 

One such product is Myo, created by graduates from the University of Waterloo who founded Thalmic Labs, funded and backed by Y Combinator and $1.1M of seed funding from a portfolio of early stage investors.  The device seems to be based not on external observation from a camera, or solely the positional information from accelerometer based sensors, but on the principle of electromyography.  This is a non-invasive means of measuring the electrical activity from neurological activation of muscles, including the “recruitment order” of muscles.  Or in English, sensors that can tell your muscles are moving, by how much, and in which order … essentially recording and recognising a signature for complex and intricate movements at the degree of accuracy of a finger twitch.  In terms of latency, since electrical activity to muscles precedes the movement of the muscle itself, not only does this offer a non-invasive measurement with infinite field of vision, but it will offer the perception of zero latency…any computed reaction to a gesture will be immediate and delightful.

Check out the video here.  The future is now.

Like Kinect, the team at @Thalmic Labs are releasing an open SDK for Myo, allowing others to innovate upon their innovation.

I trust, as an industry, we are only just getting started.